Complete Guide toNursing Job Negotiations

VitalCheck - Klarion Wellness - Crystal Hill, VA 

Must have experience administering Flu vaccines. Customer service-oriented, able to work independently, have great "bedside" manner.

$45 - $65 an hour
Telespecialists - Remote 4.2

Working with the Managers of the Medical Staff Division, the Medical Staff Division Coordinator is responsible for physician performance management.

$63 - $96 an hour
Inova Health System - Leesburg, VA 3.7

The Clinical Technician 1 assists in the delivery of direct patient care under the supervision of the Registered Nurse. Job Types: Full-time, Part-time.

Stream Valley Veterinary Hospital - Ashburn, VA 

Must have excellent communication skills, good typing speed, and organizational skills. FT with rotating shifts that include some weekends and holidays.

$20 - $22 an hour
Loudoun County School District - Ashburn, VA 3.0

Experience in the field of nursing and health care, particularly nursing care related to school-aged children. Participates in the Medicare billing process.

$66,450 - $122,790 a year
Loudoun County School District - Ashburn, VA 3.0

This health position provides support of health service programs provided at schools. An employee in this class is responsible for assisting the Registered…

$18.80 - $19.97 an hour
4ES Corporation - Remote 

This work will support the U.S. COVID-19, Monkeypox vaccination program’s vaccine safety programs, as well as any other vaccine used during a public health…

$80,000 - $87,000 a year
Amalgamated Medical Care Management, Inc. - Remote 

Conducts sound nursing assessments and offers alternatives following established nationally-recognized clinical guidelines. Associate Degree in Nursing Science.

Health Advocate - Remote 

Plus, consider these perks: Benefits for full- and part-time employees, generous paid time off, and fun employee events, like holiday luncheons and dress down…

Estimated: $45,000 - $62,000 a year
LifeHealth - Remote 3.9

Registered Nurse will provide services 40 hours per week (5 days a week, 8-hour shifts or 4 days a week 10- hour shifts).

$33.50 - $36.50 an hour
Upside Health - Washington, DC 

Our digital health company, Upside Health, supports clinicians with the remote care of their chronic pain patients. Carry your own liability insurance.

$25 - $45 an hour
ThriVe Nation - United States 

ThriVe offers a generous compensation package including Medical, Dental, Vision, 401k, Paid Time Off, and Holidays. Top pay for non-profit field.

Estimated: $53,000 - $70,000 a year
Pro-IT - Remote 

This employer requires all employees, temporary labor, consultants, and contractors to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by their start date (other date may…

$35 - $36 an hour
Health Advocate - Remote 

Plus, consider these perks: Benefits for full- and part-time employees, generous paid time off, and fun employee events, like holiday luncheons and dress down…

Estimated: $47,000 - $61,000 a year
RTR Financial Services - Remote 

_RTR Financial Services has been in business since 1999 collecting on behalf of hospitals from insurance carriers. Microsoft Word: 3 years (Required).

$50 - $125 an hour
Vital Health and Aesthetics - Ashburn, VA 

Day shift, Monday to Friday. Licensed in Virginia as RN. Minimum of one year of clinical experience providing direct patient care,. Job Types: Part-time, PRN.

Float Health Inc. - Remote 

The Clinical Operations Coordinator will be responsible for scheduling and assisting patients as well as performing detailed computer work.

$45 - $55 an hour
Health Advocate - Remote 

Plus, consider these perks: Benefits for full- and part-time employees, generous paid time off, and fun employee events, like holiday luncheons and dress down…

Estimated: $46,000 - $61,000 a year
Loudoun County School District - Ashburn, VA 3.0

This health position provides support of health service programs provided at schools. An employee in this class is responsible for assisting the Registered…

$18.34 - $19.48 an hour

Complete Guide toNursing Job Negotiations

If you’re looking for employment opportunities or need to negotiate any aspect of your current job, our guide to job negotiation for nursing can help.

What is a negotiation?

Negotiation in nursing takes two forms. The first negotiation type occurs when a nurse applying for a new job pitches their salary during the application and interview process. The second is when a nurse in an existing position negotiates additional pay or vacation time in exchange for taking on added duties. You negotiate with the human resources department or hiring manager. Before agreeing to any offer, get it in writing.

When would you negotiate?

When you receive a new offer for a nursing position, you can negotiate your salary, start date, vacation policy and other benefits, such as your medical, dental, vision and life insurance coverage. If you choose to enter the military, as a nurse, you can negotiate your commission as an officer.

You would also negotiate when you receive a promotion. Your additional responsibilities should also come with a salary increase and some increase in benefits if you do not already have all the available benefits.

When you relocate for your nursing job with your existing employer or a new one, you can negotiate your start date, relocation fees and other benefits. Some employers will pay for your travel to relocate. Some will assist you in finding an apartment or home in your new city.

When you quit a job, get fired from it or get laid off, you can negotiate a severance package, which can include your end date, closing compensation package and other benefits, such as the extension of COBRA coverage for insurance. When you retire, you can negotiate your end date and any continued insurance coverage.

Tips on negotiation

Let go of any fear of negotiating. According to American Sentinel University, 84% of employers expect you to negotiate.

New offer: Know your worth. Before negotiating, check with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine what nurses at your grade with your specialty and in your state get paid.

Promotion: Show why you are worth more money. Bring transcripts to show your progress toward a higher nursing degree or to show you already earned it. Moving from a nurse with a bachelor’s degree to one with a master’s degree increases your value.

Relocation: Negotiate moving expenses when you accept the job. Ask for relocation funds or for the hospital or other medical facility to place you in an extended-stay hotel or executive apartment while you find a permanent dwelling. Since these options often cost more than typical rents, it is not out of line to request assistance.

Severance: Negotiate your accrued paid leave according to your needs. If you need paid time to find a new position and do not want a gap in your employment on your resume, ask to use your paid leave to extend your end date. This provides you continued income while you job hunt. If you already have a new job lined up, ask to cash out your paid leave as a lump sum at your end date.

Retirement: Negotiate extended insurance coverage, especially for long-term care insurance. If you’re retiring but run a business on the side, ask about deferring annuity payments. There’s no reason to have those monthly payments if you won’t actually need the money, and, like money from other retirement sources, you’ll have to pay taxes on it once it leaves your account.

Common mistakes during negotiation

According to Minority Nurse, the biggest mistake is not negotiating. According to a recent study cited by American Sentinel University, 49 percent of job candidates do not negotiate their job offer. Some people do not “enjoy advocating for themselves,” but negotiating improves outcomes for every nurse.

New offer: It is a mistake to make an offer first. Let the employer offer the salary they determined appropriate, and then you can make a counteroffer.

Promotion: It is a mistake to threaten to quit if your demands for higher salary are not met. Instead, negotiate other items besides pay. Additional paid time off, increased benefits or additional matching contributions to your 401(K) can help you in the long run.

Relocation: It is a mistake to look only at the relocation expenses provided. Consider the full package. Your increased hourly wage or annual pay may make up for the relocation expense quickly. Your total compensation package includes benefits like bonuses, insurance, 401(k) matches, stock options, holiday and vacation time, personal time, reimbursement for continuing education and staff discounts.

Severance: Not asking for extended insurance coverage, also known as COBRA, is not in your best interest in most cases.

Retirement: Like severance packages, don't forget to ask for extended insurance coverage. Obtaining new insurance at retirement age costs more, so you’ll need affordable coverage while you look into other insurance options.