Complete Guide to Networking for your Job

ALDI - Ashburn, VA 3.4

Whether it's in customer service or our exceptional products, we owe our success to the efficiencies we create in every corner of our company and the people at…

$14 an hour

PETSMART - Sterling, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $22,000 - $28,000 a year

Harris Teeter - Ashburn, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $30,000 - $39,000 a year

PETSMART - Leesburg, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $20,000 - $28,000 a year

Harris Teeter - Leesburg, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $28,000 - $40,000 a year

Coqui Living - Ashburn, VA 

Must have your own car and be able to be in Ashburn, Alexandria, or DC as needed. I am searching for a special person to fill the gaps in managing my home and…

$15 - $18 an hour

PETSMART - Dulles, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $21,000 - $27,000 a year

PackagePulse - Fairfax, VA 

Another requirement that applicants must meet is having a valid State driver´s license and a clean driving record. Transporting packages all under 50lbs.

$200 - $250 a day

The Wine'ing Butcher Ashburn VA - Ashburn, VA 

Now hiring at 20915 Ashburn Road,…

PETSMART - Reston, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $20,000 - $29,000 a year

Master Lee's Martial Arts - After school, Summer Camp - Ashburn, VA 

Now hiring at Ashbrook Commons Shopping Center, Plaza #126,…

PETSMART - Chantilly, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $22,000 - $27,000 a year

Intellectual Point - Reston, VA 4.5

Excellent experience in answering telephones. Answer telephones from clients and test takers seeking information on training & testing, training schedules etc.

$25,000 - $35,000 a year

PETSMART - Fairfax, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $21,000 - $28,000 a year

dnata - Sterling, VA 3.7

Possess/maintain a valid State driver's license and other FAA/USPS/Airport required identification/seals or authorizations. Most items weight under 20 lbs.

$18 an hour

Party Depot - Ashburn, VA 3.9

Now hiring at Ashbrook Commons Shopping Center, Plaza #145,…

Harris Teeter - Aldie, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $29,000 - $38,000 a year

Catapult Solutions Group - Chantilly, VA 4.3

Must have a valid driver’s license. Minimum of 6 months experience with data entry – using a computer terminal, scanner, and electronic document management…

$17 an hour

Everything and The Dog - Ashburn, VA 

Must live in Ashburn or the very immediate area, have your own transportation, and be over 21 years old. Work from home and walk dogs Monday - Friday usually…

$350 a week

Loudoun County Government - Leesburg, VA 3.8

Receive calls for service from the public and promptly determine the urgency of the call; Accurately enter calls for service into the Computer Aided Dispatch…

$48,000 - $69,000 a year

Complete Guide to Networking for your Job

If you want to know how to build a roster of professional contacts, we have prepared a guide to networking.

What is networking?

Networking is communicating with and contacting others in the hopes of building a roster of social and professional contacts.

Why is it important?

Networking is important because it gives you a handy list of people that you can approach if you need help or want to learn something. By reading this guide to networking, you can build a large roster of contacts to build your career.

How to Network

The first people who you will approach to network is what is called your first-degree network. These are people that you know directly. There are pros and cons to networking with each type of person in your first-degree network.

Classmates are an ideal group to reach out to when networking. Chances are, you knew other before professional considerations were an issue and grew up professionally together. Therefore, they will feel as if they have a stake in your success. Your relationship with classmates will also be based on a give-and-take so helping each other is your currency.

A negative is that classmates are fish in the same pond as you and may be hesitant to fully help you since it could impede their ability to access certain options. They may not want to put you in touch with a connection because they may want to use the connection themselves.

Colleagues will often be the ones to best understand your specific professional needs since they either work with you or have done so in the past. They will understand what you are like as an employee and can put in a personal word for you having known your strengths in a professional capacity. It is one thing to say that someone is qualified because they know you personally. There is another degree of credibility when people have worked alongside you and know what you can do on the job.

One of the downsides to networking with colleagues is that you may not receive the discretion that you need. If your networking request involves finding a new job, you may not want to let that secret out to someone at your job.

Friends truly have an incentive to help you when it comes to networking. They help you because they like you and not because they feel obligated. They are likely to give you the unvarnished truth, as opposed to your family who may not want to hurt your feelings or colleagues who may feel the need to be political. Friends may also have diverse experiences or backgrounds, which will put them in a position to know more people.

Like family, people may not want to ask their friends for help because they feel embarrassed. People sometimes feel like they are in competition with their peers and may feel diminished when asking a peer for help. Also, there may be some trepidation at offending the friend and losing a friendship if the networking request goes awry. If your friends mainly work in a different career field, they may not have a line on jobs that will work for you.

It is generally good to approach family because they will try to help you no matter what. Family members will always tend to be on your side and are the least likely to tell you no when you ask for a favor. In addition, they will know you the best so they can help to make the best introductions.

The negative side of using your family to network is that many people do not like to mix their business and personal life in case something goes wrong. In addition, many people do not like to be seen needing help from their family.

After your first-degree network, you can try finding online opportunities for networking.

LinkedIn is the first site that people think of when they think about professional networking. You will start by building a professional profile that is meant to serve as a digital advertisement for your skills and abilities. On LinkedIn, you make personal connections by reaching out to others and by joining relevant groups where you can encounter people with whom you have something in common. Your best strategy is to cast a wide net, but be selective about networking opportunities.

When you are attempting to make a connection, it is important to tailor the request and not to make a random blind request. You need to give people a reason to make a connection with you. Join groups that are relevant to your goals and interests and become a regular and measured participant. Make sure that every post is targeted and has a purpose. Then, if you have a quality interaction, follow it up with direct communication.

Facebook groups and pages are the best place to find both events and people who share the same career interests. There are groups devoted to certain areas and professions. Pay attention to who is active on these groups and make sure to thoughtfully participate in the discussions. Try to become associated with a particular topic as someone who has expertise if you want to earn the respect of the group.

You can make real connections on Facebook by engaging constructively. Never publicly post in a manner that is opinionated or off-putting, but try to add value wherever you can. To the extent that you can validate or encourage someone else who posts, do so because that is another way to make a friend. Try to attend events that are advertised on Facebook regularly so people can put a physical presence together with your online one.

Search for people who frequently post about your areas of interest. Alternatively, you can look for people who work at a given company and pay attention to what they have to say. Sometimes, people will share things for or about their company on Twitter and you can search using these terms and follow people who you know can help you down the line.

One way to make real connections on Twitter is by interacting with people who respond to tweets. For example, if a noted corporate executive tweets and receives a bunch of replies, try responding to those who interact with the tweet. If they are receptive to what you have to say, try to send a direct message (DM) to continue the conversation. You have absolutely nothing to lose by doing this. You can also reach out to people who can help who have a decent, but not an overwhelming, amount of Twitter followers.

Somewhere between personal connections and online activities, you can also meet people locally. There are local chamber of commerce events where you can make new connections. You can also attend other events such as alumni gatherings from your school and specialized societies that cater to your particular skill set. You can find local networking events on Meetup.com and Event Brite.

Conferences are also a great place to network. Most professional associations have regional annual meetings. This is a perfect place to get the word out that you are looking to change jobs.

Networking tips

When you are at a networking event or calling someone to make a connection, it is important to maintain professionalism at all times. This means that your demeanor is businesslike, and you do not act overly familiar with others. If you are meeting the individual in person, while you do not need to be overly formal, you should also dress in a professional manner. When you are asking a family or friend for help, also know that they will tend to repeat what you say to other people.

If you are at an event, you should not count on someone to remember your contact information if you tell it to them verbally. You also should not expect that they will give you their contact information for follow-up communication. Therefore, you should bring something printed with you like a business card to give them the option to contact you in the future.

Common mistakes

When you make a connection, you do not want to let it go to waste by not following up on it. Once you have had contact, it is best to touch base periodically, even if it is just to say hello. Sometimes, just having a friendly conversation can cement a connection and take it beyond simply business.

Networking falls into a gray area because people think that they are mixing friendship with business. A common mistake is to distort the balance between business and friendship. You want to be friendly but not overdo it. At the same time, you want to avoid the impression that you are simply using people for their connections. Being insincere will be off-putting to people.