Hiring TruthsRemote Jobs Editions

ALDI - Ashburn, VA 3.4

Whether it's in customer service or our exceptional products, we owe our success to the efficiencies we create in every corner of our company and the people at…

$14 an hour

PETSMART - Sterling, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $22,000 - $28,000 a year

Harris Teeter - Ashburn, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $30,000 - $39,000 a year

PETSMART - Leesburg, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $20,000 - $28,000 a year

Harris Teeter - Leesburg, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $28,000 - $40,000 a year

Coqui Living - Ashburn, VA 

Must have your own car and be able to be in Ashburn, Alexandria, or DC as needed. I am searching for a special person to fill the gaps in managing my home and…

$15 - $18 an hour

PETSMART - Dulles, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $21,000 - $27,000 a year

PackagePulse - Fairfax, VA 

Another requirement that applicants must meet is having a valid State driver´s license and a clean driving record. Transporting packages all under 50lbs.

$200 - $250 a day

The Wine'ing Butcher Ashburn VA - Ashburn, VA 

Now hiring at 20915 Ashburn Road,…

PETSMART - Reston, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $20,000 - $29,000 a year

Master Lee's Martial Arts - After school, Summer Camp - Ashburn, VA 

Now hiring at Ashbrook Commons Shopping Center, Plaza #126,…

PETSMART - Chantilly, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $22,000 - $27,000 a year

Intellectual Point - Reston, VA 4.5

Excellent experience in answering telephones. Answer telephones from clients and test takers seeking information on training & testing, training schedules etc.

$25,000 - $35,000 a year

PETSMART - Fairfax, VA 3.6

Develop your leadership skills as a Department or Assistant Manager role. Stocker, guest service, customer service, inventory leader, clerk retail, store,…

Estimated: $21,000 - $28,000 a year

dnata - Sterling, VA 3.7

Possess/maintain a valid State driver's license and other FAA/USPS/Airport required identification/seals or authorizations. Most items weight under 20 lbs.

$18 an hour

Party Depot - Ashburn, VA 3.9

Now hiring at Ashbrook Commons Shopping Center, Plaza #145,…

Harris Teeter - Aldie, VA 3.7

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS Valid Driver's License. Technical Skills - Assesses own strengths and weaknesses; Takes responsibility for own actions;

Estimated: $29,000 - $38,000 a year

Everything and The Dog - Ashburn, VA 

Must live in Ashburn or the very immediate area, have your own transportation, and be over 21 years old. Work from home and walk dogs Monday - Friday usually…

$350 a week

Loudoun County Government - Leesburg, VA 3.8

Receive calls for service from the public and promptly determine the urgency of the call; Accurately enter calls for service into the Computer Aided Dispatch…

$48,000 - $69,000 a year

Il Cappero - Leesburg, VA 

Now hiring at 19307 Promenade Drive,…

Hiring TruthsRemote Jobs Editions

As technology in its many forms has made it increasingly easy to connect with people around the world, it has reshaped the way many crucial functions in society are structured. This is especially true of the way we work. Working from an office is no longer necessary, and remote work is on the rise in many industries.

While there are many benefits to remote work for both employees and employers, it’s not for everyone. Employers need to keep in mind particular traits that are indicative of a good remote worker, such as strong communication skills and tech-savviness.

The same goes for the process of hiring remote workers. The nature of the work is different, and therefore, hiring managers need to account for that when assessing applicants for remote positions.

We previously surveyed more than 850 hiring managers for in-officer workers about the interview behaviors and resume elements that could help you land a traditional office job, but with the rise of remote work, we felt the need to look at the hiring practices for remote workers. To do this, we surveyed 508 people with experience hiring remote employees to see what they look for and what turns them off. We also surveyed 498 current full-time remote employees about their experiences working outside of a traditional office. Read on to see what we found out.

Hurdles to Getting Hired

A part of what can make a job interview stressful is not knowing exactly what the hiring process entails at a certain company. Whether it’s an unexpectedly difficult interview question or an additional task to assess logic and problem-solving skills, it can be difficult to gauge what will be asked during the process.

According to the hiring managers surveyed about hiring remote workers, their process didn’t stray too far outside the norm of regular interviews. Ninety-one percent of managers said they interviewed remote applicants either in person or over the phone, and 70 percent read each applicant’s entire resume. Fifty-three percent verified applicants’ previous employment.

One thing that could be particularly helpful for remote applicants is having previous remote work experience. More than a third (36 percent) of hiring managers said they checked for previous experience as a remote worker when assessing applicants. While it may not be a requirement to have worked remotely before, it could signal to potential employers that you already possess the traits of a successful remote employee.

While the structure of the hiring process for remote workers may not differ much from in-office employees, there are still some differences. Hiring managers were much more likely to read applicants’ entire resumes and cover letters compared to hiring for remote workers. They were also more likely to ask in-office applicants why they were looking for a new job. This could be due to the nature of the gig economy, with people working as contractors and freelancers on multiple projects at once.

As far as what hiring managers were more likely to do when hiring remote workers, they took to the internet: Hiring managers were more likely to Google remote workers and check their LinkedIn profiles during the hiring process.

Qualifying Questions

You’ve done it: You’ve landed an interview for your dream job working from home. You have your power outfit picked out and you’ve double-checked your internet connection for your video interview. The only thing tripping you up is not knowing what interview questions to expect. Most people probably know and could answer some of the most common interview questions, but the last thing you want is to be caught off guard by an unexpected question.

Sixty-three percent of hiring managers said they always asked remote applicants about their previous experience working remotely (if they had any). It may seem like a straightforward or even unimportant question to ask, but it could hold a lot of sway with hiring managers. Employers want someone who can hit the ground running, and they might not be willing to act as the “guinea pig” for a person who is new to remote work.

Other potential questions remote applicants might be asked include how they handle the lack of face-to-face contact while remote and what their home office is like. Working outside of an office allows for a lot more freedom and a lot less structure. Employers want to know remote workers can implement schedules and structure for themselves. People who have difficulty with that won’t thrive as remote employees.

Winning Resumes

While remote work is different than traditional office work, hiring managers are still looking for similar things on the resumes of remote applicants. Having a graduate degree was viewed positively by 80 percent of hiring managers, and a bachelor’s degree was viewed positively by 78 percent of them. While there has been debate around whether an Ivy League degree is worth the expense (with some people getting into some complex math to determine the value), a majority of hiring managers (66 percent) said it was a positive on a resume.

As for the potential pitfalls on a resume, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that grammatical and spelling errors were viewed negatively; in fact, a few (or more) errors ranked worse than lying on a resume.

On Your Best Behavior

If your resume and cover letter got your foot in the door, it’s the interview’s job to seal the deal with a potential employer. According to 71 percent of the hiring managers surveyed, arriving early to the interview was the most common way to curry favor. Conversely, arriving late was a major turnoff for hiring managers regardless of whether they were hiring remote or in-office workers, with 90 percent and 93 percent, respectively, viewing it negatively.

One thing remote workers should be mindful of while preparing for Skype or video interviews: what their environment looks like on camera. Eighty-seven percent of hiring managers said that a disorganized or inappropriate interview environment was a turnoff. Ideally, candidates should consider and plan their surroundings beforehand. A quiet room with good lighting and a neutral background is typically best. It will minimize distractions for the interviewer and could do the same for you.

Other behaviors hiring managers weren’t fans of included unrealistic compensation requirements, whining, and an obvious lack of preparation.

Know Your Interviewer

While some behaviors are generally accepted as inappropriate, it’s possible that a minor annoyance to one person could be a major red flag to another.

We looked at the behaviors of remote applicants that hiring managers rated as most negative and broke them down by the gender of the hiring manager. Across the board, female hiring managers were more likely to rate all the behaviors as negative compared to male hiring managers. There were behaviors that the genders were mostly in agreement on, however, such as arriving late to the interview (89 percent of men and 90 percent of women) and answering questions incorrectly (85 percent of both men and women).

However, there was a large gap between men and women when it came to remote applicants’ salary expectations. Women were much more likely than men to be turned off by unrealistic compensation expectations, with 89 percent of women viewing it negatively, compared to 78 percent of men.

A part of this could be due to the higher likelihood of men to negotiate salaries. It’s possible a male hiring manager will be more likely to expect candidates to negotiate, and therefore, not be surprised or bothered when a candidate does so. Regardless of whom you’re dealing with, salary negotiations are a delicate matter. You should be prepared to get questions about salary in the interview, but it’s best to respectfully deflect compensation questions until you’ve received a formal offer.

Just as an interviewer’s gender can affect his or her perception of you, so too can the age of your interviewer. Hiring managers aged 40 or older were more likely to rate behaviors negatively than those in their 20s and 30s. For example, interviewers in their 40s were most likely to have their opinion of an applicant negatively affected by a disorganized or inappropriate interview environment (92 percent), compared to 79 percent of hiring managers in their 20s.

Hiring managers in their 20s and 50s (and older) were most likely to be bothered by remote applicants talking too much during the interview. Interviews *are *an opportunity for you to get to know the company as much as the employer is trying to get to know you, but talking nonstop can make you appear either arrogant or extremely nervous. Plus, the more you talk, the higher the likelihood of saying something that hurts your chances of getting the job.

Neutral Behaviors

It can be overwhelming trying to keep your perfectly composed answers to interview questions in mind while also trying to remember what behaviors to avoid. Thankfully, there are some things that hiring managers aren’t likely to put too much stock in.

While the U.S. unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent in February of 2019, there are still many job seekers without current employment. According to the hiring managers, 65 percent said their opinion of a remote job applicant wasn’t impacted positively or negatively by them being currently unemployed.

Additionally, appearance elements that have traditionally been taboo during job hunts – tattoos, unnatural hair colors, and body piercings – weren’t given much consideration when assessing remote applicants.

The Remote Experience

As with most things, remote work comes with pros and cons. You can have a lot more flexibility and save money by not commuting to an office every day, but it can be harder to connect with co-workers and avoid distractions at home (like that pile of laundry that’s taunting you while you’re on a conference call).

Overall, though, the remote workers surveyed were happy with their work arrangement. Over 80 percent said they were satisfied with their job. As for the loneliness that can come with remote work, many seemed unfazed by it. Of those who hadn’t visited a company office while working remotely, 66 percent said they didn’t have a desire to visit one.

Making Remote Work ... Work

While the very nature of remote work is unusual when compared to traditional office environments, we found that the traits that hiring managers desire in remote employees aren’t much different from what they’d expect of someone clocking in at the office every day. Remote applicants will be put through similar hiring processes, but hiring managers will be on the lookout for previous experience as a remote worker and strong prioritization and task management.

If you’re looking to make the leap into working remotely, SimplyHired is here to help. Our tailored search engine lets you search openings by company, job title, skill set, and location to find the job that’s right for you. To learn more, visit SimplyHired.com today.

Sources

Methodology

We surveyed 508 people who had participated in the process of hiring a remote worker before, and we conducted a separate survey of 498 full-time remote workers. For the survey of hiring managers, respondents were 61.2 percent men and 38.8 percent women. The average age of the hiring managers surveyed was 37.6 with a standard deviation of 10.7. For the survey of remote workers, respondents were 51.7 percent women and 48.3 percent men. The average age of remote workers was 35.2 with a standard deviation of 10.5.

We previously surveyed more than 850 hiring managers with experience hiring in-office workers. Results from that survey were included in this project for comparison purposes. That study in its entirety can be found here.

Hiring managers for remote workers were asked about behaviors they always looked for when hiring remote applicants, as well as questions they always asked remote applicants.

For resume elements and applicant behaviors, hiring managers were asked to rate each behavior or element on the following scale:

  • Negatively affects
  • Slightly negatively affects
  • Neither negatively nor positively affects
  • Slightly positively affects
  • Positively affects

This scale was grouped simply into negatively affects, positively affects, and neither negatively nor positively affects in our final visualization of the data. The behaviors presented in each of these three groups represent data where a majority of hiring managers rated them as positive, negative, or neutral.

Remote workers were asked about their job satisfaction. They were given the following options:

  • Very dissatisfied
  • Dissatisfied
  • Neither dissatisfied nor satisfied
  • Satisfied
  • Very satisfied

These were combined into three groups in our final visualization of the data: dissatisfied, neither dissatisfied nor satisfied, and satisfied.

Limitations

Due to the nature of the gig economy and remote work, it’s possible that hiring managers answered survey questions based on their experiences hiring remote workers for a single project or a limited amount of time. This could have impacted the data on hiring behaviors. For example, people could be less likely to conduct interviews or background checks if they are going to be working with a person for a limited period.

Fair Use Statement

Know someone who’s trying to make the jump to working remotely full time? Pass along this study for noncommercial purposes to help them prepare for the interview process as a remote applicant. Just be sure to include a link back here so that they can get the lowdown on what not to do in a remote interview. It also gives our contributors credit for the work they do.