Researcher

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) - Remote

Contract
UN Women (UNW), grounded in the vision of equality enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, works for the elimination of discrimination against women and girls; the empowerment of women; and the achievement of equality between women and men as partners and beneficiaries of development, human rights, humanitarian action and peace and security. Placing women’s rights at the centre of all its efforts, the UN Women leads and coordinates the United Nations system efforts to ensure that commitments on gender equality and gender mainstreaming translate into action throughout the world. It provides strong and coherent leadership in support of Member States’ priorities and efforts, building effective partnerships with civil society and other relevant actors.

Women in Gaza continue to suffer from the consequences of the protracted humanitarian crisis. In economic terms, the high unemployment rates influence both genders, but women experience the consequences at much greater rates. The high fertility rate and unemployment rate among educated women, and low labor participation rates are among the distinct features of the situation of women in Palestinian society. Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS) data reveals that 22.0% of women aged 20-24 years gave birth before the age of 18 and this percentage is higher in the Gaza Strip compared to the West Bank (25.1% and 19.6% respectively). Labour force participation rates in Palestine is one of the lowest globally (21%). There is also a gap in the average daily wages between men and women (the average daily wage for women was 92 NIS compared to 129 NIS for men). While female participation in the labor market has increased over the past few years, females in Gaza continue to have a higher unemployment rate (51%) than males (25%). The unemployment rate for people 15 years and older in Gaza rose to staggering 48.2 per cent in 2018.

Justification:
From the start of the Gaza Great March of Return demonstrations on 30 March 2018 and up to 31 May 2019, two women and one girl were killed by Israeli forces, and over 2,434 women and girls were injured. The high number of injuries has also had negative repercussions for women’s lives, often resulting in emotional stress at the household level, including higher exposure to GBV. Some women have reported psychological and physical abuse by their husbands, who held them responsible for their participation in the demonstrations and the injury or loss of their children. Women who have been injured and might end up with a form of disability face social discrimination and limited access to services. Those who have lost a spouse and become “new widows” are exposed to financial need and legal problems as death of a primary breadwinner has a direct and immediate impact on the living conditions of the widow and children. Moreover, young girls in families who lost a breadwinner face a higher risk of child marriage. All in all, key GBV service providers have received double the number of GBV cases that they received in 2017 because of the mass demonstrations.

According to a recent study published in 2019, women injured due to participating in the GMR have different needs. Their top priority needs include food security (%67,5), safety and security (60%), adequate housing (55%), adequate health care (55%), and removing logistical restrictions (40%). 12,5% of all injured women used to work before injury and all of them could not return back to work after injury due to not finding jobs that are adequate for their lives after injury (25%) and due to bad health conditions (75%). 45% of all injured women suffered from physical abuse and (2.5%) from sexual abuse. While only (35%) received psychosocial support, (65%) did not. Overall, 66.7% of those who received assistance were dissatisfied because it was insufficient and did not fully address their needs. Women are not only affected if they are directly injured. As mothers and carers, they have to carry the burden of taking care of injured people in the family (more than 90% of GMR injured men, women and children had a form of disability) including children and spouses which affect their wellbeing, psychosocial status and access to opportunities outside the domestic sphere (i.e. livelihood)).

In the framework of the HRP strategic objective 2 “The basic needs of vulnerable Palestinians living under occupation are met through the provision of quality basic services and improved access to resources, in accordance with the rights of protected persons under IHL”. Also in alignment with the Protection Cluster OBJECTIVE 2:"Protection response mechanisms are in place to prevent and mitigate the effects of the occupation and conflict related violence" and the Humanitarian Fund allocation strategy purpose and Objective 1:” Mitigate the impact of the violence in the context of demonstrations at the fence with Israel, as well as restrictions imposed by the PA on Gaza since early 2017, both of which occur against the backdrop of an 11-year blockade by Israel”. Also, in the framework of the project titled: “Multisectoral Responses to Women Victims and Survivors of Gender Based Violence in the Gaza Strip” (May 2019 – May 2010) funded by UN OCHA Humanitarian Fund, UN Women aims to develop the following:

An Assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return (GMR), focusing in particular on the direct and indirect impact on women and girls and their access to services, two years after the GMR had started. This assessment should unpack the quantitative findings of the Humanitarian Needs Assessment Study of the Great March of Return’s injured Persons”, produced by the Palestinian Centre for Democracy and Conflict Resolution (PCDCR) in 2019.
A series of case studies that unpack the gendered impact of the protracted humanitarian crisis on some of the most vulnerable groups in Gaza (as identified by humanitarian clusters). The case studies should explore how protracted exposure to conflict and violence, existing household dynamics, prevailing social norms, negative and positive copying mechanisms and limited access to services create gender-based vulnerabilities and increase risk and exposure to gender-based violence. The case studies should provide concrete recommendations on how to utilize and tailor cluster response to meet the needs of the different groups, ensuring their protection and supporting their resilience.

Duties and Responsibilities

Under the overall guidance of UN Women Special Representative, and the direct supervision of UN Women Programme Management Specialist in Gaza, the Consultant will undertake the following tasks, duties and responsibilities:

Develop an inception report including study methodology and work plan for the development of the Assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return (GMR) and the development of a series of case studies that unpack the gendered impact of the protracted humanitarian crisis on some of the most vulnerable groups in Gaza (as identified by humanitarian clusters).
Address UN Women feedback and comments on the inception report in a timely manner.
Consult with UN humanitarian actors including but not limited to ICCG members, clusters coordinators, Gender Focal Points, INGs and local NGOs. With support of UN Women, establish a reference group for both assignments and ensure active engagement of the reference group members in reviewing, verifying and supporting conducting the assignments.
Develop a final assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return, focusing in particular on impact on women and girls and their access to services, two years after the GMR had started. This assessment should unpack the quantitative findings of the Humanitarian Needs Assessment Study of the Great March of Return’s injured Persons”, 2019. The final report should be fully proofread and edited in English and approved by UN Women task manager.
Develop a summary in Arabic of the findings of the Assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return.
Develop a final series of case studies that unpack the gendered impact of the protracted humanitarian crisis on some of the most vulnerable groups in Gaza (as identified by humanitarian clusters). The case studies should explore how protracted exposure to conflict and violence, existing household dynamics, prevailing social norms and limited access to services create gender-based vulnerabilities and increase risk and exposure to gender-based violence. The case studies should provide concrete recommendations on how to utilize and tailor cluster response to meet the needs of the different groups, ensuring their protection and supporting their resilience. The final report should be fully proofread and edited in English and approved by UN Women task manager.
The case studies should explore emerging trends and vulnerabilities as identified by the clusters. Upon initial discussions, the clusters have identified some key areas that need further analysis including but not be limited to the following:
The Protection Cluster

Women addicts as a vulnerable group, their exposure to gender-based violence and access to available services.

The Wash Cluster

Existing WASH facilities safety and privacy and how this affects the different groups (women, girls, men and boys) including the elderly and women with disabilities.

The Shelter Clusters

Shelter design and how this affects the different groups (women, girls, men and boys) that are in need and at risk.

The Food Security Cluster:
Level of female farmers’ contribution to the food industry and agricultural labor force in Gaza, with focus on the unpaid work of female farmers in the agricultural sector.

The Education Cluster

Discriminatory gender norms that impact access to education especially for adolescent girls and children with disabilities in Gaza, with a focus on the Access Restricted Area (ARA).

The Health Cluster

Gender dynamics that influence both women's and men's exposure to risk factors or vulnerability; access to and understanding of information about disease management, prevention and control; household-level investment in health care.

Timeframe:
The assignment planned to be conducted within a 5 - month period. The assignment is expected to start on 04.11.2019 and to be finalized by 31.03.2020.

Deliverables:
The consultant is expected to submit key deliverable as follows:

Research inception report, including the methodology, research tools and approaches and timeframe. The inception report is due on 25 November 2019.
Final proofread and approved drafts of the Assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return and the Case Studies. The reports are due on 31 March 2020.
A summary in Arabic of the findings of the Assessment of the gendered impact of the Great March of Return. The summary is due on 31 March 2020.
The consultant must address several rounds of UN Women and clusters members’ feedback in a satisfactory manner. The deliverables must be submitted in English and must be approved by the UN Women Task Manager.

Competencies

Core Value/Guiding Principles:
Integrity.
Professionalism.
Respect for Diversity

Core Competencies:
Awareness and Sensitivity Regarding Gender Issues
Accountability.
Creative Problem Solving
Effective Communication
Inclusive Collaboration
Stakeholder Engagement
Leading by Example
Please visit this link for more information on UN Women’s Core Values and Competencies: http://www.unwomen.org/-/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/about%20us/employment/un-women-employment-values-and-competencies-definitions-en.pdf

Functional Competences:
Proven research and facilitation skills.
Outstanding knowledge of gender, women’s rights and the different challenges with regard to gender equality.
Strong communication and presentation skills in English (oral and written).
Ability to work under pressure and to deliver on time.
Results oriented, flexible and with problem solving skills.
Strong Communication skills in English (written and oral).
Ability to work under pressure within team work arrangements.

Required Skills and Experience

Education:
Advanced university studies in Gender, Development or Social studies.

Experience:
The Consultant should have the following qualifications:
At least 5 years of relevant expeirence with proven research and publications recrods.
At least 2 years of relevant experience in research and data collection in humanitarian setting.
At least 2 years of proven professional experience in the field of women’s empowerment and gender equality.
At least 2 year working experience in the Palestinian context generally and in Gaza humanitarian context particularly.

Language Requirement:
Fluency (both oral and written) in English.
Fluency in Arabic.

Evaluation of applicants:
This SSA modality is governed by UN Women General Terms and Conditions. UN Women will only be able to respond to applicants who meet the minimum requirements.

Candidates should clearly indicate how they meet the above-mentioned criteria in their applications.

The following documents should be submitted as part of the application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Please make sure you have provided all requested materials:

P11 Or CV including past experience in similar assignments; can be downloaded at http://www.unwomen.org/about-us/employment, a signed copy should be submitted
Candidates should have the ability to quickly submit degree certificates, medical certification (of good health) expression of Interest (EoI) should they be short-listed in consideration of this consultancy.

Long listed candidates should provide a sample of final gender analysis reports including data collection methods, research plan and methodology and report findings.

Evaluation of applicants:
Candidates will be evaluated using a cumulative analysis method taking into consideration the combination of the applicants’ qualifications mentioned above; and financial proposal. A contract will be awarded to the individual consultant whose offer receives the highest score out of below defined technical and financial criteria. Only candidates obtaining a minimum of 50 points in the technical evaluation will be considered for financial evaluation.

Technical Evaluation:
Relevant education (10 points).
Sample of previous relevant work including research reports (20 Marks).
At least 5 years of relevant experience with proven research and publications records (10 points).
At least 2 years of relevant experience in research and data collection in humanitarian setting; (10 points).
At least 2 years of proven professional experience in the field of women’s empowerment and gender equality; (10 points).
At least 2 year working experience in the Palestinian context generally and in Gaza humanitarian context particularly (10 points).
Total 70 points

Financial Evaluation (30%) – max. 30 points:
The consultant will be paid on lump-sum basis. The lump sum amount shall be inclusive of all incurred costs, including but not limited to: consultant fee, local transportation, field work…etc. ?

The maximum number of points assigned to the financial proposal is allocated to the lowest price proposal. All other price proposals receive points in inverse proportion. A suggested formula is as follows:

p = 30 (µ/z)

Using the following values:
p = points for the financial proposal being evaluated
µ = price of the lowest priced proposal
z = price of the proposal being evaluated

UNDP is committed to achieving workforce diversity in terms of gender, nationality and culture. Individuals from minority groups, indigenous groups and persons with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply.